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Russian Red Cross in Nice named best nursing home in France

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Russian Red Cross in Nice named best nursing home in France


19.11.2021

Photo credit: Kor_el_ya / pixabay.com

The Russian Red Cross (La Croix Rouge Russe) has topped the rating of nursing homes in France. The list was compiled by one of the statistical agencies in France and is based on interviews with relatives of patients of nursing homes and experts, Russian eyewitness reports.

5,600 nursing homes were analysed during the study, with 250 institutions among the best. The quality of service, the level of care for the elderly, the cost of services and other indicators were taken into account.

The Russian Red Cross received more than nine points out of ten possible. It is has also got a 100% result in the Recommendations category.

The institution was opened in the spring of 2012 under the patronage of the Russian Red Cross, which has been carrying out its mission since 1867. Before the October Revolution, the organization was supported by the Russian imperial family. The opening ceremony was attended by the Russian ambassador to France and the mayor-deputy of Nice. The building of the nursing home was rebuilt, which helped to increase the number of guests to 87 people.

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